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October 05, 2010

The Knowledge Supply Chain

It was quite an honor giving a joint presentation yesterday with John Zachman & Leon Kappelman at SIMposium 2010 in Atlanta, GA.

I presented a case study on "Building Mobil's Knowledge Base and Knowledge Supply Chain." We talked about how Enterprise Architecture and Knowledge Engineering helped preserve, share, and automate The Knowledge of the corporation.

This was the right time to introduce new ideas we've been working on with customers for a while.

  • The Knowledge Wars™
  • The Knowledge Supply Chain™
  • BIZRULES® RuleMart™
  • BIZRULES® RuleMall™
  • BIZRULES® KARMA (sm)
  • Ruling The Cloud (sm)

You'll hear more about this at RulesFest next week

You can hear more about these ideas, plus get the technical version of this case study, next week at RulesFest 2010 in San Jose, CA. 

SLIDES:  http://www.bizrules.com/library/KnowledgeSupplyChain_forSIM2010_byRolandoHernandez.pdf
SLIDES SHORT LINK:  http://bit.ly/93t7kq
TWITTER:  @BizRulesInc  #BIZRULES | #simposium2010 | #rulesfest  www.Rulesfest.org

May 07, 2010

Terrorists are Coming To Town

Terrorists are coming to town.

 

We better watch out
We all might die
Stay home don't go out
I'm telling you why

Terrorists are coming to town.

 

TSA's making a list,
Airlines aren't checking it twice;
We'll never find out Who's naughty or nice.
Terrorists are coming to town.

 

Wall Street's closed when you're sleeping
Drops 1,000 points when you're awake;
Some rule fool trades 16 billion shares
instead of 16 million.
So be good for Goldman's Sake!

 

Rule Fools are running Wall Street.
Rule Fools are running this town.

 

No more need to worry
Cause Rules are coming to town.
Cause Principles are coming to town.

 

O! We better watch out!

BP is gonna try,
To stop the 5,000 feet underwater oil spout

By giving a containment dome a try.

 

I know their Experts have
The Knowledge to fix it.
One day we'll know

Why the Blowout Preventer blew it.

 

Rule Fools are running Wall Street.
Rule Fools are running this town.

Terrorists are coming to town.

Terrorists are coming to town.

 

BP Oil Containment Dome   Blowout Preventer (US OSHA)

 


© Rolando Hernandez 

Please use Twitter hashtag #RULEFOOL for this post
Follow me on Twitter username @BizRulesInc

 

Check out Ten Rules for Restoring Trust in Wall Street, BP, TSA, Airlines... and anyone else who wants to do business in this town!

 

March 12, 2009

Join the Federal Knowledge Management Initiative & Federal KM Working Group

Join the Federal Knowledge Management Initiative & Federal KM Working Group

America faces critical challenges today (information overload, brain drain in government, sharing knowledge, automating knowledge, making laws easier to understand, etc.) and enormous opportunities in the years ahead.

I truly believe KM is part of the solution that can help us overcome the challenges and seize the opportunities.

Government and private sector KM executives have united and formed the Federal Knowledge Management Initative to convince our leaders in Congress and the Obama Administration to coordinate, formalize, and centralize America's efforts around knowledge management.

This presentation by Neil Olonoff summarizes the "Federal Knowledge Management Initiative Roadmap." The initiative, begun several months ago by members of the Federal Knowledge Management Working Group, aims to establish an official center for knowledge management in the Federal Government. With this center of operations as a start, the Federal government can begin to foster knowledge sharing practices and culture, build innovation, and find solutions to the Knowledge Retention Crisis. And there is much more to the plan. Learn how you can become a part of this exciting, ambitious new direction for knowledge management in Government, by attending via phone and computer.

Download Federal Knowledge Management Initiative PPT

Join the Federal KM Working Group. No dues are involved. To join the listserv, send a blank e-mail to kmgov-subscribe@list.jpl.nasa.gov

Read the Roadmap on their Wiki page:

http://www.km.gov

February 04, 2009

WARNING: CEO's need to wise up and "bail out" of billion dollar IT projects right now

WARNING: CEO's need to wise up and "bail out" of billion dollar IT projects right now

Dear CEO: 

I am sick and tired of reading about billion dollar IT projects that we both know are never going to work, change, or last. It's time to stop the non-sense and use common-sense.

Here's just one example from InformationWeek. California is spending $3,600,000,000 (that's $3.6 BILLION) on these systems:

• Financial system: 11.8 years, $1.6B
• Strategic Offender System: 5.7 years, $416M
• Home Support Services: 10 years, $298M
• Automated Welfare System: 3.8 years, $263M
• Child Welfare System: 7.3 years, $254M
• Motor Vehicles IT Modernization: 6.8 years, $207M
• Consolidate IT Infrastructure: 2.9 years, $191M
• HR System: 6.1 years, $179M
• ERP for Prisons: 4.5 years, $176M 

Do you really want to cut your systems development budget?

Here's how:

Let's say you're planning an 18-month $18 million systems development project. Imagine that's the cost and time for analysis, design, programming, testing, and deployment.

Using business rules, rulebases, rulebased technology, and architecture and engineering principles, we can program that system in 12 months and $12 million. It's that easy.

We can save you 6 months and $6 million just by using rule-based programming languages instead of hard-coding your rules.

If you can tell us exactly what all your business requirements are, and how many business rules you have, well then we can bring your costs down even more.

We can find enough good qualifed experienced out of work programmers right now who are just as cost-effective and as productive as any programmer in any country who would love to work on your project. And they're ready to start as soon as you're ready to save $$$.

When do you want to start saving millions of dollars?

Hurry, you must act now. Call 1-800-SAVE. The first 50 callers will save an additonal $1 million if you call in the next 30 days. You must call before shareholders find out how much you're really spending on systems development.

PS - By the way, for every $1 billion you spend on development, you're spending $5 billion on maintenance. It's time to stop IT non-sense. You must call now!

December 12, 2008

Agility Alliance - New open social network connects technology gurus and business masterminds

Agility Alliance - New open social network connects technology gurus and business masterminds

I’d like to reach out and invite all my IT/business friends to join the Agility Alliance, a free online network that helps bring together technology experts and business leaders:

http://www.agilityalliance.org     

The Agility Alliance network is an open social network, for experts, by experts. We’d like to keep it technical, friendly, open, fun, and non-commercial (i.e. no marketeering).

If you are into BRM, BRMS, BPM, BPMS, CRM, SCM, EDM, CEP, etc. there is a group for you. If not, create a group! It's flexbile so you can create your own group, blog, or forum to share with all of us.

If you're a programmer, analyst, designer, architect, engineer, business executive, VP, CTO, or CIO, and you are a leader in your field, or you want to hear what the leading minds in these fields have to say, join the network and become a member of your favorite group.

I hope this network becomes a place to share great ideas, learn from the best, and find "the best of" links to blogs, presentations, videos, and discussions in your favorite topics. Mine, as many of you know, are managing rules and knowledge.

What do you know? Share... Show and tell. This is not the place to sell.

It’s pretty open and flexible, so you can add groups, blogs, photos, slides, videos, chat, links, forums, tutorials, articles, etc. There are individual pages each member can customize, and each member gets his/her own blog (if you want it). You can post articles, templates, links, and add discussions to the forum. Invite your friends and colleagues to join. If you can’t figure out how it works, ask your kids!

Two months ago the idea of building a professional network for rulebase experts and knowledgebase exeprts was first proposed at ORF2008. I loved the idea. I started creating it, but it didn't feel right. Something was missing.

A big problem in our field is that business people talk dollars and IT people talk data. Alignment, or lack thereof is the biggest complaint CIO's have had for years.

Creating a closed network for just the top rule experts in the world was an awesome challenge, but I also wanted CIOs to have access and see what these genuises have to say. Business people need to hear what geeks have to say.

Geeks landed us on the moon; But business people paved the path and led the way.

We all need to bridge the gap between business and technology. I am extremely confident that the Agility Alliance network will help connect business and IT experts.

The time is right to create a network of IT experts and business leaders. The network is just a few days old, so this is just a start.

The rest is up to you.

 

September 25, 2008

Principles are Coming

Principles are Coming

More judgment and knowledge needed

While the finance industry is moving toward more rules and exceptions, and rules-based regulation, financial accounting and reporting is moving in the opposite direction, towards fewer rules and exceptions. Accounting and tax is moving towards more principles-based regulation.

The US is moving away from GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and towards IFRS (International Financial Reporting Standards). IFRS is the reporting framework used by most of the world today, and it has growing support in the US. IFRS relies on professional judgment rather than detailed rules. Under this principle-based approach, management will have a mandate and obligation to exercise its own best judgment when making decisions.

Companies will need to implement systems that use knowledge and judgment to make principle-based decisions.

It is time to adopt knowledgebase technology and knowledge management. It's time to build knowledge bases and embed knowledgebased technology into operations and existing systems.

Knowledgebased systems that are engineered and architected properly can

  • follow principles and guidelines
  • automate management's best judgment
  • ensure compliance
  • and deliver trust. These expert systems can be trusted because they use expert judgment to make the same decisions top experts would make, thus improving the quality, accuracy, and consistency of decision-making.

I don't believe there is any other practical or proven way of automating human judgment, other than building intelligent, knowledge-based systems.

Knowledgebased systems are the solution for principle-based compliance.

Rules are Coming

Rules are Coming 

More rules and regulations are coming

To restore trust in the financial system, the government is moving towards more rules and exceptions, and more rules-based regulation. The trend towards de-regulation is over. Regulatory reform is coming back. That means more rules and regulations than ever before.
 
Management will have an obligation to follow the rules and laws when making decisions. These decisions better be consistent, correct, complete, and compliant if you really want to stay in business. 

Companies will need to implement systems that follow the rules and make rule-based decisions.

It's time to adopt the business rules approach and business rules management. It's time to build rulebases and embed rulebase technology into operations and existing systems.

Rulebased systems that are engineered and architected properly:

  • follow the rules
  • automate management's decisions
  • ensure compliance
  • and deliver trust. Rule engines can be trusted because they implement the decisions management intended.

Rulebased systems and business rules management are the solution for rule-based-compliance.

Sept. 2008 credit crisis

On Sept. 10, the world's largest particle collider and atom smasher was turned on for the first time. Skeptics warned that the Large Hadron Collider, a 17-mile circular tunnel under the Swiss-French border designed to smash protons so they shatter and recreate the Big Bang, would create a black hole inside the Earth. 

In a world where homes could go down the drain and disappear into a black hole, the mortgage mess and global credit crisis seemed trivial in comparison.

Four days later, on Monday Sept. 15, the credit collider smashed Lehman Brothers to bits. Lehman filed for bankruptcy and instantly disappeared into the credit black hole. 

By Thursday Sept. 18, the black hole threatened to collide and smash U.S. financial markets and the entire global financial system. Then the federal government stepped in and turned off the collider with a $700 billion proposal for the largest bailout plan in U.S. history. 

One week later, on Thursday Sept. 25, the plan is still up in the air. Congress is debating the plan. President Bush just met with Sen. McCain and Sen. Obama. The world is rapidly losing trust in the U.S. German Finance Minister Peer Steinbrueck said "The United States will lose its superpower status in the world financial system. The world financial system will become more multipolar," he said.

Thursday night, Washington Mutual disappeared into the black hole, becoming the biggest bank failure in U.S. history. The government seized WaMu, took it over, and sold Wamu's $307 billion of assets to J.P. Morgan Chase for $1.9 billion.

"A crisis of confidence without precedent is shaking the global economy," French President Nicolas Sarkozy said in a speech in Toulon, France.

Toulon is close to the Large Hedron Collider, where this whole thing started. Could someone forward this message to President Sarkozy: Please shut down the collider!

 

Here are some photos inside the LHC tunnel, and in the control room on LHC First Beam Day:

LHC mission control  LHC atom smasher

LHC operators  LHC monitors

Images by Maximilien Brice    copyright CERN

 

September 12, 2008

Bosch drives into the rule engine market

Bosch has joined the club. On September 8, 2008 The Bosch Group acquired Innovations Software Technology. Both companies are based in Germany. This move heats up the BRE/BRMS market consolidation that was already sizzling:

Sep. 2008 –The Bosch Group acquired Innovations Software Technology
Jul. 2008 - IBM announced their intent to buy ILOG
Nov. 2007 – RuleBurst acquired Haley Rules
Oct. 2007 – SAP acquired Yasu
Aug. 2007 – Trilogy acquired Gensym
Oct. 2006 – Planet Group acquired ACI Worldwide
Jan. 2006 – Trilogy acquired Versata
Jan. 2006 – MDA acquired Mindbox
Sep. 2005 – Fair Isaac acquired RulesPower

(click to see the new BRE Family Tree

Oracle and Microsoft entered the business rule engine (BRE) market by building their own rule engine technology. Competitors, however, took a different approach. Global technology leaders IBM and SAP acquired BRE vendors ILOG and Yasu. Insurance software vendor MDA acquired BRE vendor Mindbox. And rule engine vendors Fair Isaac and Trilogy acquired smaller BRE vendors RulesPower, Versata, and Gensym.

I asked David S. Kim, Managing Director and CEO of Innovations Software Technology, to share his thoughts and tell us what this means to customers, end-users, and to the rules market. Here’s what he had to say in our email discussion.

How does the Bosch acquisition of Innovations compare to the other acquisitions and consolidation in the rules industry?

“The big difference is that we were not acquired to have our product line integrated into a stack of other software. We were acquired to be the core of a new software and systems company within The Bosch Group. We will be creating new technologies and value chains within Bosch and open the door to new lines of business,” Kim said.

Continue reading "Bosch drives into the rule engine market" »

August 22, 2008

Army mandates 12 knowledge management principles

"Connecting those who know with those who need to know." That is a great definition of knowledge management. And it's right out of the Army manual. The US Army recently released a knowledge management memo outlining 12 principles to encourage and reward sharing knowledge throughout the organization.

"Knowledge management is about connecting those who know (know-why, know-what, know-who, and know-how) with those who need to know and leveraging that knowledge across the institutional Army and to contractors, nongovernmental organizations, the other military services and coalition partners,” states the memo.

A few months ago I wrote about classifying knowledge as either critical knowledge or common knowledge.  Common knowledge is about your experience and what you know.  Critical knowledge is about your expertise and how you think.

Continue reading "Army mandates 12 knowledge management principles" »

March 13, 2008

Visible Knowledge LLC helps companies prevent Brain Drain

10,000 baby boomers are retiring today.

10,000 more will retire next Monday. And Tuesday. And so on. That's the way it's going to be for the next 20 years. Key personnel and subject matter experts with 20 to 30 years of experience are going to clear their desk and head down to Florida. As they walk out the door, invaluable corporate knowledge will simply disappear.

Intellectual capital, a vital corporate asset, will melt away unless companies do something to stop the brain drain and to retain critical knowledge.

Visible Knowledge LLC (www.visibleknowledge.com) has a solution:

  • An interactive RuleMap™ that models business rules & simulates business logic
  • An interactive Expertise Blueprint™ that transforms knowledge into Visible Knowledge™
  • A Legacy Interview(sm) 

Visible Knowledge helps companies retain vital corporate knowledge before it melts away. They focus on documenting invaluable critical knowledge from your top domain experts and key personnel, before they retire. It can take companies years and millions of dollars to recover from losing this type of knowledge.

A traditional exit interview is just not enough when you're dealing with subject matter experts or super experts. So Visible Knowledge has developed a Legacy Interview(sm) process that extracts and documents critical knowledge before experts leave or retire. They use a rapid knowledge acquisition process to extract maximum amount of knowledge in a minimum amount of time. Visible Knowledge focuses on capturing critical knowledge.

If Know It All Ken just gave you two weeks notice, and he's the only one who knows how to fix the $5 million widget making machine, Visible Knowledge can help. They can spend a few days with Ken and document the crucial knowledge you need to keep the business running.  

If Super Expert Sally is retiring in a few months, Visible Knowledge can spend a few weeks with her to elicit as much vital and critical knowledge as possible before she leaves.

If your entire Dept of Super Experts is retiring next year, Visible Knowledge can work with your team over the next few months or years to document the critical knowledge you need to retain.

Later, if you need to automate the knowledge that was captured and retained, companies like BIZRULES can help you do that. BIZRULES works with leading knowledge software vendors to design and build knowledge-based and rule-based solutions.

March 16, 2007

Best Buy, Bogus Prices: Confusion about pricing rules reveals need for business rules management

If employees don’t know, don’t understand, or don’t care what the rules are, you have a business rules problem.

If customers get different answers depending on who they talk to, you have a business rules problem.

If salespeople can decide whether to charge the right price or a bogus price, you have a business rules problem.

Best Buy, the nation's largest electronics retailer, has a business rules problem.

It's also dealing with a public relations nightmare, and an investigation by the Connecticut Attorney General's Office.

Pricing rules used by salespeople in Best Buy stores are inconsistent and contrary to Best Buy pricing policies established in the boardroom. “What we've learned very quickly is we have not been clear enough in communicating to our employees the policy, and how to execute it in our stores,” said Dawn Bryant, spokeswoman for Best Buy.

Success in the world of business depends on understanding the rules,” I said recently during a panel discussion on Sarbanes-Oxley compliance.

“You need to know the internal rules and policies of your business. You have to comply with the external rules and regulations that govern your business, industry, and function. Your company must ensure that rules are followed. Your company must enforce the rules. Your company must give staff tools to help them follow the rules, make legal decisions, and prevent them from making illegal decisions. Business rule management systems (BRMS) and business rule engines (BRE) help companies comply with rules and regulations like SOX.

If you don’t have a rule engine that automatically prevents employees from breaking the rules and instantly detects and prevents fraud, you’re out of the game. You’ll end up watching your stock go from $30 to $3 during lunch. You lose. You’re out of business.

Smart companies are using business rules to ensure compliance with rules, to enforce rules, to increase agility so they can change faster, to prevent business mistakes, and to reduce IT system development costs by changing rules in days not months.

Business rules technology helps business comply with rules and regulations, helps employees follow the rules, and prevents employees from breaking the rules (either accidentally or on purpose).”

Business rules management is the prescription for business rules problems. Business rules management entails everything from the business rules approach to business rules technology. 

The business rules approach helps companies transform complex policies into easy to understand business rules. What better way is there to clearly describe and communicate policies and business rules to employees?

Business rules technology helps companies execute the right business rules at the right time every time. What better technology is there to automate business rules?

What happened at Best Buy is a great example of what can go wrong when business rules are not designed and engineered properly.

Business rules are like the glue that holds together all the parts of the corporation. Business rules integrate and align all the moving parts of the corporation. With business rules management, Best Buy can ensure that rules and processes used in the stores are aligned with Best Buy pricing policies defined in the boardroom.

Without business rules management to connect the elements of the corporation, the only way to ensure the corporation works as intended is to "hope and pray," as John Zachman likes to say. With weak or wrong business rules, the corporation falls down like a house of cards.

This is why business rules management is vital to the corporation.

Business rules management is not just about documenting business rules, defining who the owners are, and deciding who is authorized to change them. It’s not just about using rule-based languages to speed up system development instead of hard-wiring rules in legacy code. It’s not just about selecting a business rules engine. It’s not just about understanding the company’s strategies, policies and business practices, and then transforming those objectives into rulebooks, descriptive business rule models, IT specifications, and finally into automated systems.

Business rules management is also concerned with architecting and engineering the business rules so they are integrated with the rest of the business. This helps ensure that the implemented business rules that are in actual use, whether automated or manual, align with the governing rules and strategies of the business.

What happened at Best Buy?

At first, I thought the Best Buy pricing problem was complicated and hard to explain. Then I wondered how can business rules help solve this problem? What would BIZRULES do if Best Buy came to us for help?

That’s easy. I like to draw pictures to simplify complex ideas. By removing the complexity, pictures help me make even the most complex concepts easy to understand:

BIZRULES Analysis of Best Buy Pricing Rules 

(Click to see medium or large slide)

This is an example of three business rules that were apparently in operation at Best Buy when this story broke. Of course, we really don't know the rules were, so this is just a good guess based on published news accounts of what really happened.

Along with a picture of the rules, this slide shows how the rules affect the rest of the company. It also shows how the rules satisfy business rules management objectives, and business rule engineering design objectives:

Rule #1 is a conceptual explanation of the pricing policy to honor the lowest price.

  • This rule tells us what management means and what their intentions are.

Rule #2 is a logical description of the corporate policy to honor the lowest price:

  • This business rule clearly shows alignment to corporate strategy.

  • This is the high quality rule prescribed by the pricing strategy.

  • This rule shows integration between online and retail stores.

  • This rule offers reusability – the same rule can be implemented online and in the store.

  • This rule shows transparency.

  • This rule reduces operations costs because it’s easy to follow.

  • This rule demonstrates regulatory compliance.

  • This picture is worth a thousand words.

  • This rule builds Customer Trust Management.

  • This is a “Best Buy” type of rule.

  • This rule is easy to approve, assess, test, and certify.

  • This rule improves governance and controllership.

Rule #3 is used (i.e. prescribed) by some salesman to mislead customers into paying higher prices:

  • This business rule is clearly not aligned to corporate strategy.

  • This poor quality rule is operational and being used in stores.

  • This rule shows discontinuity and inconsistency between online and retail stores.

  • This store rule cannot be reused online because it lacks transparency.

  • This rule increases operations costs because it’s hard to explain and justify.

  • This rule raises questions about regulatory compliance.

  • You need a thousand words to explain this picture.

  • This rule destroys customer confidence and trust.

  • This rule is public relations nightmare.

  • This rule may be illegal.

  • This is a “bait & switch” type of rule.

  • This rule should never have been approved.

  • This rule raises questions about whether proper rules, processes, and controls are in place.


Now that I understand what the current pricing situation at Best Buy is, it seems pretty straightforward:

  • Management intention is Rule #1. This is Best Buy’s pricing policy.
  • Marketing description is Rule #2. This is what marketing thinks is happening.
  • Sales prescription is Rule #3. This is what salespeople are actually doing.
  • IT specification is not applicable in this example because these rules have not been automated. If these rules were automated, an executable specification of the rule (i.e. pseudo code) may need to be developed for the programmer.


These four views of the business rules fit nicely into an Enterprise Rules Architecture.

The next step is to fit these rules into an enterprise architecture framework. I used John Zachman’s influential and compelling Framework for Enterprise Architecture as an example:

The Zachman Framework for Enterprise Architecture

(Click to see medium or large slide)

Next, I overlaid Best Buy Rules #1-3 on top of Zachman’s Enterprise Architecture Framework to add more clarity to the Best Buy pricing situation:

BIZRULES Analysis of Best Buy Pricing Rules (part 2)

 (Click to see medium or large slide)

The pricing problem at Best Buy is that the business rule used by salespeople in the stores contradicts the company’s pricing policy. Clearly Rule #3 is not aligned with Rule #1 or Rule #2.
Business rules confusion is what caused the problem.

Business rules management is the solution.

To get out of this sticky mess, Best Buy needs to:
  • establish or improve their business rules management.
  • prevent salespeople from using Rule #3 immediately
  • mandate use of Rule #2 immediately.
  • automate Rule #2 as soon as possible. Why let salespeople decide pricing at all? Let the computer figure out what the lowest price is.
  • use a business rule engine to automate this rule as quickly as possible. This rule change needs to happen overnight. But changing hard-wired rules in code takes take days or weeks. Often, companies that don’t use rule engines take months to change business rules as simple as these. This is one reason why companies buy rule engines: Changing rules in a rule engine takes minutes.
  • educate salespeople on the pricing rules. Of course, if Best Buy automated the rules using a rule engine, they wouldn’t need to train as much.
  • ensure compliance with these rules from now on.
What about the secret website?

Business rules can also help Best Buy get rid of the secret and duplicate website. It's hard enough to maintain and manage prices for thousands of products on one website, let alone two. There are costs associated with maintaining a duplicate site containing 250,000 pages; surely management and shareholders want to reduce redundant costs like these. One way is to use a business rule engine to eliminate the duplicate site and duplicate effort. Why not write a few rules to show different prices (if that really is management’s objective) depending on whether the salesman pulls up the web pages on the Internet or the "secret website" on the Intranet?

How else can business rules management and business rules technology help Best Buy? Please comment and let me know.

Rolando Hernandez

CEO & Chief Rules Architect, BIZRULES

 

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Continue reading "Best Buy, Bogus Prices: Confusion about pricing rules reveals need for business rules management" »

October 16, 2006

Press Release: HealthMarkets Selects Haley As A Business Rules Supplier

Leading Health and Life Insurer Selects Haley’s BRMS Solution for Its SOA Environment

PITTSBURGH--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Haley Systems, Inc. today announced that HealthMarkets, a leading provider of affordable health and life insurance for individuals, the self-employed, small businesses and students, has selected its Business Rules Management System (BRMS).

HealthMarkets selected Haley as a business rules vendor following a successful implementation of Haley’s BRMS. Among the key reasons for selecting Haley were the system’s platform independence, English authoring and support for a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) capability in both the runtime and authoring environments. HealthMarkets intends to use Haley in an SOA environment to achieve a shared business rule repository that will reduce duplicate business logic throughout multiple applications.

“We believe that the Haley BRMS solution enhances our ability to develop and support our business applications,” said Edward J. Zecchini, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer of HealthMarkets. “We anticipate that Haley’s BRMS technology will enable our business and technical teams to respond quickly to the constantly changing landscape of regulatory, underwriting and marketing rules of the health and life insurance industry.”

For the full press release please see below.

Source: http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20061016005070&newsLang=en

September 29, 2005

News Orleans CIO: Breaking the Rules to Restore Democracy

Here's an interesting tale from New Orleans CIO Greg Meffert on surviving Hurricane Katrina and reviving New Orleans. Goes to show you that most business rules are great in a normal world under normal business conditions. But in times of crises, sometimes you have to throw the standard operating procedures and rulebook away. That's when you need to whip out your emergency operating procedures (EOP) and rulebook. You have one right?
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